Cold or Hot – SPAM Hits the Spot!

Spam
From the back cover of the November 1, 1938 issue of Woman’s Day magazine

From this 1938 magazine ad:

“Cold or hot… SPAM hits the spot… saves you time and trouble!

Serve SPAM hot! Serve SPAM cold! Tastes grand either way. You can slice it, dice it, fry it, grill it, bake it. The choice is yours. Give your imagination free rein for new SPAM treats… hot SPAMwiches… cold SPAMwiches… SPAM canapes… SPAM party tidbits. Fine for breakfast, lunch, dinner or late evening snack. There’s a SPAM recipe for every occasion that calls for delicious meat. Because it does not need refrigeration, it’s easy to keep a good supply of SPAM always on hand… ready for action.”

SPAM is still being made today and is available at a grocery store near you! Let’s take a look at some interesting SPAM facts.

Did You Know?

Curious when SPAM was first made? SPAM is a brand of canned precooked meat made by Hormel Foods Corporation. It was first introduced in 1937 and became popular worldwide after its use during World War II. In 2007, the seventh billion can of SPAM was sold – that’s a LOT of SPAM!

Have you ever wondered what SPAM is made of? According to the label, SPAM is made of  pork shoulder meat that is ground with ham. Salt, water, modified potato starch are added as a binder, and sugar and sodium nitrite are added as a preservative. The ingredients are cooked right in the can!

1-SpamPython
2005 limited edition SPAM can – “SPAM is the holy grail of canned meats,” says Eric Idle. “We’re thrilled to dine on SPAM golden honey grail at the round table of SPAMALOT.”

Are you curious why junk email is called SPAM? In 1970, there was a Monty Python skit where two customers appear in a greasy spoon cafe for breakfast. The waitress (played by Terry Jones) tells the customers what is on the menu – “egg, bacon, sausage and SPAM or SPAM, bacon, sausage and SPAM or SPAM, SPAM, SPAM, egg, and SPAM”… and the list goes on. The word SPAM is mentioned at least 132 times in this short 3 minute skit! In the skit, the customer doesn’t like SPAM, but it’s pretty much in each menu option. This skit was very popular and years later, when early internet users flooded forums with the word SPAM, referring to the ‘repetitive and unwanted’ presence of SPAM in the skit, the term ‘spam’ for junk email and unwanted advertising stuck.

Why do Hawaiians Love SPAM? The popularity of SPAM in Hawaii dates back to World War II when SPAM was an Army staple. By the end of the war, SPAM found it’s way to Hawaii  – it was something new and different with a salty flavor. Today, the people in Hawaii eat 7 million cans of SPAM a year – that’s more than any other nation. 

Want to tour the SPAM Museum? Next time you’re in Minnesota, make sure to stop in! The SPAM Museum is located in Austin, Minnesota. I bet they even serve samples! And if you can’t make it to Minnesota, you might want to participate in the 2016 Great American SPAM Championship Contest, located in several places across the United States.

SPAM and Scrambled Eggs

If you’ve never tried SPAM before, here is a classic recipe – it’s pretty hard to go wrong with this one!

SpamEggs
SPAM and Scrambled Eggs
  • 1 12-ounce can SPAM Classic, cut into cubes
  • 2 fresh Chives, chopped
  • 4 large Eggs
  • 1/4 cup Milk or Half-n-Half Cream
  1. Whisk eggs and milk together in a bowl.
  2. Cook egg mixture in a greased skillet over medium-high heat to scramble the eggs.
  3. Add cubed SPAM to the skillet, then reduce heat.
  4. Stir mixture gently until SPAM is heated through.
  5. Garnish with chives and serve.

Want more?

Visit the SPAM website for recipes and for more information about SPAM.

 

Do you have a fun SPAM story from your childhood? Share it in a comment below!

JayDee / ThirdShiftVintage.com

You may also like

1 comment

  1. The only meat that came out of a can in my husband’s childhood was Krakus Ham! I on the other hand had spam spamwiches and fried spam for dinner. I too love the spam song from monty python!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *