Blanching Corn and Green Beans to Freeze

Or as we call it in the south, puttin’ up vegetables.

Why blanch? Blanching helps fresh vegetables retain their nutrients and color. Freeze raw and unless they are used in a very short time (2 – 3 weeks) their color will fade and they will be mushy when cooked and most nutritional value will be lost.

A must for blanching all vegetables is a LARGE vessel filled with ice and water to quickly cool the produce and prevent overcooking. Be sure to leave room to add the vegetables and additional ice as needed. When blanching large batches it may be necessary to completely change out the water if it becomes too warm to cool quickly with additional ice.

Another quick note before we begin. You must use a large pot and LOTS of water. Do not crowd the veggies! The water should return to a boil within 1 minute after the vegetables are added if not you may not have enough water. This is critical as overcooking will lead to mushy vegetables.

Blanching Corn on the cob blanching corn boiling BODY

Shucked and cleaned (silk removed) ears of corn (break in half if desired)

Dutch oven or canning pot filled 2/3 with water

1 Tbs sea salt

Bring water and salt to a boil. Add corn on the cob (we break ours in half – you may leave them whole if you like). Do NOT cook until done! Only boil for about 5 minutes for ½ ears and 7 minutes max for whole ears then remove from pot to a bowl of iced water to cool. Once cooled remove to a paper towel or cotton towel lined tray and let dry. Place in freezer bags or containers and freeze for up to 3 months.

 

Blanching Green Beans boiling-green-beans BODY

Rinsed beans with the stem end removed. You may blanch whole or break in half or smaller if the beans are very long.

Dutch oven or canning pot filled 2/3 with water

1 Tbs sea salt

Bring water and salt to a boil. Add beans and boil for 3 minutes NO LONGER. Remove with a slotted spoon to the ice bath. Once cooled remove to a paper towel or cotton towel lined tray and let dry. Place in freezer bags or containers and freeze for up to 3 months.

 

tomatoes BODY (1)~ Bonus tip for peeling tomatoes ~

Need to quickly peel tomatoes for a sauce or soup later in the week? Since you will have boiling water and an ice bath at hand already just follow this tip!

Place 2 – 3 large or 4 medium WHOLE tomatoes (stem removed “hulled”) in boiling water and watch for their skin to wrinkle and split. As soon as that happens quickly remove them to the ice bath. Once cool you may remove them from the ice bath and place on your cutting board. The skin should peel off using just your fingers or perhaps a gentle tug with a paring knife. Easy peasy!

 

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Dot ~ AtticAndBarnTreasures.com

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3 comments

  1. Thanks for the great tips! While we don’t have a vegetable garden (yet), we are fortunate to have neighbors who usually have extra fresh vegetables that they share. 🙂

  2. I don’t have a garden this year either but I like to freeze tomatoes for use in the winter for soups and I use the same method described here. As far as the corn, I’ve never froze it on the cob but blanch it on the cob and then cut it off and freeze in freezer bags.

    I recently run onto a sale on cauliflower and I knew I was buying too much but I ended up cutting it up and blanching and put it in freezer bags for use in soups or just eat with butter or cheese sauce. Yumm!

    1. Thank you both for the comments!
      Tina, Thank you for mentioning the cauliflower! I forgot to add in my post that most “hard” veggie can be blanched and frozen for later use.

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